News

Mon
24
May

Council bats eight in two-hour meeting

What appeared to be a killer agenda was managed in just under two hours by the Ely city council last Tuesday.<BR><BR>There were eight requests to appear and slew of other items to consider as six men took their seats. Mike Hillman was absent. <BR><BR>The first request came from Robin Mathews, the chair of the Planning Commission, who was going to ask to have Hillman replaced as a council representative due to missing so many meetings. <BR><BR>But before Mathews could begin, Mayor Frank Salerno cut him off at the pass, asking if the commission had officially acted on the request.<BR><BR>Mathews said that a motion had not been approved by the board. <BR><BR>“The recommendation needs to go from P&Z and be forwarded to us for consideration,” said Salerno.<BR><BR>“We can do that,” said Mathews. “So if P&Z were to vote and be in favor of removing Mr.

Mon
24
May

Big change at cemetery, above ground headstones to be allowed in new area

With hopes of cutting down on clutter, the Ely city council passed a motion Tuesday night to allow above ground headstones in the newest section of the cemetery.<BR><BR>Appearing before the council were Dorene Steklasa and Paul DeWeese from the Cemetery Committee.<BR><BR>“We are here to request a major change, to allow above ground headstones in the new section,” said Steklasa. “Even though some get toppled over in the old section you only see a few plastic containers or flower holders.<BR><BR>“In the newer section we have one site where there are three cans and a beer bottle,” said Steklasa. “People are erecting their own monuments.”<BR><BR>She said the different rules for each area provides for a lack of unification and is aesthetically unpleasing.<BR><BR>“Some have two to three hanging baskets and a plastic statute.

Mon
24
May

Dispatch service could be phased out by July 1

The future of the city of Ely dispatch service may become clearer after another meeting on the hot topic was held last Thursday.<BR><BR>With four council members in attendance, the Budget Committee reviewed numbers provided by Butch Pecha and Paul Kess on the costs of keeping the service.<BR><BR>After an hour of discussion, what became apparent was that the city can save money by not having the service.

Mon
24
May

Ely Surf Shop opens Friday; aims at teens and young adults

The Ely Surf Shop has a ’50s flare with many treats in store for Ely’s teens, young adults or anyone young at heart when it opens on Friday at 213 East Sheridan Street. <BR><BR>One side of the shop is a ’50s style soda fountain with chrome and red leather stools and a menu of snacks. Customer can slurp ice cream sodas, old fashioned type of malts, shakes, Cokes, chocolate Cokes, root beer floats, gourmet coffee, including espresso, latté, cappucino, and even regular coffee. Variations on ice cream include: Wolf Tracks (caramel), Birch Bark, Snow Ball (vanilla), Black Bear (chocolate), No Udder (sorbet), and Angel (fat free vanilla yogurt). <BR><BR>The gourmet Chicago-style hot dogs lineup ranges from ‘Chilly Dogs’, ‘The Lead Dog’, ‘The Deer Hound’ (venison bratwurst), ‘The Bad Dog’ (chili, jalepeno and onions), ‘The Wurst Dog’ (bratwurst with sauerkraut) and ‘Neutered Dog’ (a no meat soy weiner).

Mon
24
May

Ely Surf Shop opens Friday; aims at teens and young adults

The Ely Surf Shop has a ’50s flare with many treats in store for Ely’s teens, young adults or anyone young at heart when it opens on Friday at 213 East Sheridan Street. <BR><BR>One side of the shop is a ’50s style soda fountain with chrome and red leather stools and a menu of snacks. Customer can slurp ice cream sodas, old fashioned type of malts, shakes, Cokes, chocolate Cokes, root beer floats, gourmet coffee, including espresso, latté, cappucino, and even regular coffee. Variations on ice cream include: Wolf Tracks (caramel), Birch Bark, Snow Ball (vanilla), Black Bear (chocolate), No Udder (sorbet), and Angel (fat free vanilla yogurt). <BR><BR>The gourmet Chicago-style hot dogs lineup ranges from ‘Chilly Dogs’, ‘The Lead Dog’, ‘The Deer Hound’ (venison bratwurst), ‘The Bad Dog’ (chili, jalepeno and onions), ‘The Wurst Dog’ (bratwurst with sauerkraut) and ‘Neutered Dog’ (a no meat soy weiner).

Mon
17
May

Children’s Art Camp will be held June 16-18

Art Camp will take on a slightly new focus this year when the event takes place June 16-18. Sponsored by Ely Greenstone Public Art, the popular camp, now in its third year, will be held at Semers Park.<BR><BR>Fliers will be sent home with Ely students in grades 2-6, ages 8-12 exclusive, with information about the event. Classes will be held Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 12:30 -4 p.m.<BR><BR>Volunteers have been meeting to plan the classes to be offered. Additional helpers are welcomed to assist. Call Anne Swenson at 365-5917 or 365-3141 or Judy Fredrickson at 365-4020 if you are interested in helping one or more days.<BR><BR>There is a tuition fee of $20 per child, but scholarships are also available.<BR><BR>Class space will be limited so that student receive lots of personal attention. Early enrollment is encouraged. Camp participants will be limited to a total of 40 students, with 10 students in each class.

Mon
17
May

Morse waiting for Fall Lake fire payment

Morse Township will pursue a written agreement with Fall Lake for the operation of their joint fire department.<BR><BR>But in the meantime, Morse will continue to cover all expenses associated with operating the department, much to the chagrin of at least one township supervisor.<BR><BR>At Tuesday’s town board meeting, supervisor Jack Willis was on the losing end of several 2-1 votes - all dealing with fire department expenses or operations.<BR><BR>Willis, who was outvoted by supervisors Len Cersine and Terry Soderberg, contends that Morse should hold back on any further fire department spending until Fall Lake comes on board.<BR><BR>“We’re still going down that road where the town of Morse is paying the whole bill,” said Willis.

Mon
17
May

Minnesota Wild players coming to Ely on June 1

The Minnesota Wild hockey team will include Ely as part of its promotional travel tour this summer. <BR><BR>On June 1 one current player and other representatives of the Wild will be in town.<BR><BR>At 10 a.m. the Wild will visit with elementary students at Washington Auditorium. <BR><BR>A luncheon will follow in the Ely Ice Arena, from 10:45 a.m. to noon. Tickets for the luncheon are $10 for adults and $5 for kids. <BR><BR>Tickets are available from Blue Line members or by calling Betsy Leustek at 365-4903. <BR><BR>The Wild visit is sponsored by Wells Fargo, the Ely Blue Line and WELY. <BR><BR>Autographed items such as sticks, pucks, photos and yearbooks will be raffled off at the luncheon.

Mon
17
May

Dispatcher service could be axed

Police and fire dispatcher service in Ely would be eliminated under a cost-cutting plan advanced by the city’s budget committee.<BR><BR>Committee members voted 2-1 Thursday to recommend that the city council discontinue the positions and move the current dispatchers into other jobs within the city.<BR><BR>The council could act on the recommendation, which calls for a six-month transition period, as soon as Tuesday’s regular (5:30 p.m., City Hall) meeting.<BR><BR>Two years ago, the council rejected a similar proposal and opted to maintain full-time emergency dispatch service. <BR><BR>But given recent budget deficits and declines in state aid to local governments, council member Paul Kess said that dispatchers provide a luxury the city can no longer afford.<BR><BR>“It’s a great service and people are used to it,” said Kess. “But it isn’t a core service.

Sun
09
May

Henning to retire from EADA

Bill Henning, Ely’s economic developer for nearly a decade, will retire at the end of the month.<BR><BR>The director of the Ely Area Development Association notified the organization’s executive board of his plans last week.<BR><BR>Henning, a 57-year-old native of Brooklyn, N.Y. and a retired Air Force pilot had been with the EADA since 1995.<BR><BR>“There’s a time for everything,” said Henning. “There was a time for me to retire from the Air Force. There was a time for me to move to Ely. My body was telling me that it was time to (retire) now or they were going to carry me out of this office dead. I’m not leaving town, but it’s been going on nine full years that I’ve been at this. The normal (tenure) of an economic developer is three years.”<BR><BR>Henning, who was appointed by Gov.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - News