Columnists

Mon
26
Apr

Baby boomer echoes

Hey! Prom time is right around the corner.<BR><BR>Boomers remember that as one of the major events of the year. And I’m sure Boomer parents won’t forget the expenses and worries about where are those kids going after the big event. <BR><BR>I believe Boomer gals were under the impression someone would ask us to the prom. So Boomer guys were under a lot of pressure unless they already hooked up with a steady. <BR><BR>The waiting game began a month or so before this major event. Would some guy ask you? What kind of dress would you pick? All that stuff. And if you were a junior in high school, your class was in charge of putting on the whole deal. Getting involved in the whole process, like decorating and arranging the food, chaperones, etc. might give you the chance to participate. Being a class officer just about guaranteed entrance to the function.<BR><BR>Proms today are high scale.

Mon
19
Apr

Baby boomer echoes

Who invented the wheel? A Boomer kid might have said the caveman did. At least our cartoons told us that story. All we know is that it was prehistoric.<BR><BR>Whoever invented it made our lives much more enjoyable and easy. <BR><BR>I guess as a kid, who would give a heck of a thought to that. We just knew certain things came equipped with the rolling force.<BR><BR>Our first experience was probably a baby carriage or “buggy.” I would bet most of us don’t remember the experience, but our Boomer Moms do, and that’s the main thing. The buggy gave Ma the freedom to get out of the house while exposing junior to some fresh air. She could run a few errands, stop and chat plus still keep her eyeball on the kid. And if Ma was lucky, some “old timer” might peek into the carriage - congratulating Ma on such a healthy baby, who of course looks just like Dad or “your side of the family.” <BR><BR> During Boomer times, baby buggies lined the streets.

Mon
12
Apr

Bush pilots: Tragedy & Rescue at Cherry Lake

I recently read an article in a publication that referred to a rescue at Cherry Lake, For whatever reason, the article was not accurate or complete. In January of 1995 I began writing articles for The Ely Echo. The first one was published on February 6, 1995. The 26th article, titled Tragedy and Rescue at Cherry Lake was published on December 11, 1995.<BR><BR>This was a high risk rescue, Over the years, many rescuers have needed rescuing or a coroner. I used to refer to Pat Magie as my prize student because he was very sharp. What he did took a lot of courage and skill. As for Dr. Ciriacy, I believe he had a cast iron gut to sit there, in the dark, closing on a dead end at 117 feet a second.<BR><BR>As for me, my biggest hazard was probably the US Forest Service. In their eyes, my flight was completely illegal. I didn’t have authorization, and no radio contact. I had a passenger, Mr. Harristal, with me, and it was a night flight.

Mon
05
Apr

From the miscellaneous drawer

I’m lucky. I work at a job that I love with some of the nicest, brightest people I know. <BR><BR>It’s a pleasure to come to work and do work which is meaningful to me and to the community of readers and advertisers.<BR><BR>If there were more time in my week and more energy in my 68 year old body, I’d love to do more. Write more. Take more photos. Interview more people. Delve into more issues. <BR><BR>I’m lucky because I found the joy of newspaper work before my working life was over. It seems it was just beginning when I started at the Echo not quite 30 years ago.<BR><BR>The obituaries which are sent in the newsletter from our newspaper association indicate that newspaper people lead long lives. Most of them are writing almost to the end of their life at age 80 or 90.

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