Columnists

Sun
06
Jun

Baby boomer echoes

It’s that time of year… spring storms and more stuff coming through the summer months. May has proven to show us some lightning and thunder, power outs and at times an early alarm clock while practicing the art of slumber. <BR><BR>I think most Boomer kids will agree that so called storms today don’t live up to the ones we remember as kids. I will make exception with the ’99 blowdown and the time the tornado siren kept sounding due to funnel clouds passing through the Burntside area. <BR><BR>Back in the ’50s and ’60s we had predictable weather. May was usually cold with plenty of frost and sometimes snow. Then you’d suddenly get an 80-degree day to start up the dandelions.<BR><BR>June usually was a good month to build an ark like Noah. It was common to expect rain for 40 days and nights. <BR><BR>We knew what June showers produced.

Sun
30
May

Memorial Day is special for 5,796 of us

Memorial Day is special for 5,796 of us.<BR><BR>This is aimed at young people. The ones who are age 17 to 25. These are the ones we can relate to, those of us who are now in our 80s.<BR><BR>Memorial Day means a lot of different things to different people. It is a time to visit the cemetery and pay our respects to friends and family members who have passed on. There is always a ceremony at the Ely Cemetery to honor veterans of the nation’s wars. There is a speech. The color guard fires a salute. The bugle sounds taps.<BR><BR>So what’s that got to do with you? Well, 60 years ago, young people, we were you. We are old, grayed, and we have difficulty standing straight now. But 60 years ago we were young and feisty, just finishing high school or in college. And we were suddenly caught up in a war we did not want, did not seek. Indeed, our nation’s elders tried to keep us out of war, but those who chose to target us as their enemy would not have it.

Mon
03
May

Jo Hardy - A passion for bowling

It would be hard to find a woman anywhere in the world with a greater passion for bowling - and the people to whom bowling is important - than Jo Hardy. That passion was rewarded on April 18, when she was inducted into the Minnesota Women’s Bowling Association’s Hall of Fame for Meritorious Service.<BR><BR>She was first notified in September of 2003 by Mary Peck, President of the Minnesota Women’s Bowling Association (MWBA), that she was to be inducted into the Minnesota Bowling Hall of Fame. That event took place on April 18, 2004, at the Rosedale Radisson Hotel.<BR><BR>She was accompanied to the event by all of her family except her oldest and youngest sons and was given a standing ovation from the large audience in attendance.

Mon
26
Apr

Baby boomer echoes

Hey! Prom time is right around the corner.<BR><BR>Boomers remember that as one of the major events of the year. And I’m sure Boomer parents won’t forget the expenses and worries about where are those kids going after the big event. <BR><BR>I believe Boomer gals were under the impression someone would ask us to the prom. So Boomer guys were under a lot of pressure unless they already hooked up with a steady. <BR><BR>The waiting game began a month or so before this major event. Would some guy ask you? What kind of dress would you pick? All that stuff. And if you were a junior in high school, your class was in charge of putting on the whole deal. Getting involved in the whole process, like decorating and arranging the food, chaperones, etc. might give you the chance to participate. Being a class officer just about guaranteed entrance to the function.<BR><BR>Proms today are high scale.

Mon
19
Apr

Baby boomer echoes

Who invented the wheel? A Boomer kid might have said the caveman did. At least our cartoons told us that story. All we know is that it was prehistoric.<BR><BR>Whoever invented it made our lives much more enjoyable and easy. <BR><BR>I guess as a kid, who would give a heck of a thought to that. We just knew certain things came equipped with the rolling force.<BR><BR>Our first experience was probably a baby carriage or “buggy.” I would bet most of us don’t remember the experience, but our Boomer Moms do, and that’s the main thing. The buggy gave Ma the freedom to get out of the house while exposing junior to some fresh air. She could run a few errands, stop and chat plus still keep her eyeball on the kid. And if Ma was lucky, some “old timer” might peek into the carriage - congratulating Ma on such a healthy baby, who of course looks just like Dad or “your side of the family.” <BR><BR> During Boomer times, baby buggies lined the streets.

Mon
12
Apr

Bush pilots: Tragedy & Rescue at Cherry Lake

I recently read an article in a publication that referred to a rescue at Cherry Lake, For whatever reason, the article was not accurate or complete. In January of 1995 I began writing articles for The Ely Echo. The first one was published on February 6, 1995. The 26th article, titled Tragedy and Rescue at Cherry Lake was published on December 11, 1995.<BR><BR>This was a high risk rescue, Over the years, many rescuers have needed rescuing or a coroner. I used to refer to Pat Magie as my prize student because he was very sharp. What he did took a lot of courage and skill. As for Dr. Ciriacy, I believe he had a cast iron gut to sit there, in the dark, closing on a dead end at 117 feet a second.<BR><BR>As for me, my biggest hazard was probably the US Forest Service. In their eyes, my flight was completely illegal. I didn’t have authorization, and no radio contact. I had a passenger, Mr. Harristal, with me, and it was a night flight.

Mon
05
Apr

From the miscellaneous drawer

I’m lucky. I work at a job that I love with some of the nicest, brightest people I know. <BR><BR>It’s a pleasure to come to work and do work which is meaningful to me and to the community of readers and advertisers.<BR><BR>If there were more time in my week and more energy in my 68 year old body, I’d love to do more. Write more. Take more photos. Interview more people. Delve into more issues. <BR><BR>I’m lucky because I found the joy of newspaper work before my working life was over. It seems it was just beginning when I started at the Echo not quite 30 years ago.<BR><BR>The obituaries which are sent in the newsletter from our newspaper association indicate that newspaper people lead long lives. Most of them are writing almost to the end of their life at age 80 or 90.

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