Newspapers, always under scrutiny, provide freedom of speech to readers too

Newspapers. The industry has been under scrutiny for some years.

Probably each of us has an idea of what our personal favorite newspaper should be. There’s always the question of whether we need to approve of every item in our personal newspaper or if we would be bored not knowing what our neighbors or opposites think.

There’s the quick gut reaction found in social media - Facebook, Twitter, and other sources, but they are not the permanent mark of a letter to the editor of a newspaper. This newspaper.
This newspaper is part of the record of the United States. It becomes a part of the Library of Congress Copyright Office.

When a letter to the Echo office is submitted by email or in print, what happens to it?

Almost always it gets printed.

The publisher readies it for the paper and then it is shown to the Editor, General Manager and also to other staff members of the Ely Echo.

Barring slander or libel, the letter goes into the next edition. It may be trimmed for length but so are our editorials for that matter.

Do we agree with every word written by letter submitters? No, but we firmly believe in freedom of speech and freedom of press.

We are aware of economic pressures which may be (and have been) placed to alter this newspaper’s policies in regard to these freedoms, but we stand firm on those freedoms.
We believe that is what our readers expect of us.